The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

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Interested in Criminal law in the Roman Republic? Chinese legal history? Buddhist law? Marriage? Alcohol regulation U.S., Islamic or Chinese Law? You will find information on these topics by using the online version of The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History.

The Encyclopedia is an illustrated reference work with about 1000 articles – written and signed by noteworthy contributors – on these and many other history of law topics. Each entry contains cross-references to related articles and a bibliography of additional readings.

The Encyclopedia covers ancient, medieval, and modern law in eight legal traditions and geographical/cultural areas: Ancient Greek Law, Ancient Roman Law, Chinese Law, English Common Law, Islamic Law, Medieval Roman Law, United States Law, and law in other regions (Africa, Latin America, and South Asia among them).
Major categories of law are addressed within these traditions, including private law (contract, tort, civil procedure), varieties of public law (criminal law, administrative law, statutory law), and higher law/constitutional law. It will be the first encyclopedia of law to provide historical and contemporary comparisons of world legal systems.

Searching the encyclopedia
If you search for two or more words, the search engine will automatically search for all these words; thus making an AND combination. You can search for an exact phrase by enclosing it in double quotes, e.g. “separation of powers”. It is also possible to search with ‘wildcards’. For more information consult Help -> Using the search tools.

Use the ‘browse function’ to get a quick overview of the available topics.

Cite, and link to an entry
Do you want to cite an entry in a paper or link to an entry using e.g. Blackboard? Look for ‘How to cite this entry’ at the bottom of each entry. Next to citing information you will find a ‘permalink’ e.g. http://www.oxford-legalhistory.com/entry?entry=t277.e623-s2.